Portronics Cool Pad Wood Portable Laptop Table(Finish Color - Off White)

Brand: Portronics ID: PLLEX5YSNHDFJ9H4

My Buddy (portable laptop stand with cooling fan) If you are looking for multi utility cooler desk, then My Buddy would be the best choice for you. This is the ultimate laptop accessory that allows th...more▼

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About this item

cool or COOL may refer to:

Pad, PAD or pads may refer to:

Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material – a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees, or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs. In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots. Wood may also refer to other plant materials with comparable properties, and to material engineered from wood, or wood chips or fiber.

Wood has been used for thousands of years for fuel, as a construction material, for making tools and weapons, furniture and paper. More recently it emerged as a feedstock for the production of purified cellulose and its derivatives, such as cellophane and cellulose acetate.

As of 2005, the growing stock of forests worldwide was about 434 billion cubic meters, 47% of which was commercial. As an abundant, carbon-neutral renewable resource, woody materials have been of intense interest as a source of renewable energy. In 1991 approximately 3.5 billion cubic meters of wood were harvested. Dominant uses were for furniture and building construction.

Portable may refer to:

  • Portable building, a manufactured structure that is built off site and moved in upon completion of site and utility work
  • Portable classroom, a temporary building installed on the grounds of a school to provide additional classroom space where there is a shortage of capacity
  • Portable toilet, a modern, portable, self-contained outhouse manufactured of molded plastic

In computing:

  • Portable object (computing), a distributed computing term for an object which can be accessed through a normal method call while possibly residing in memory on another computer
  • Software portability, software that can easily be ported to multiple platforms
  • Portable applications, applications that do not require any kind of installation onto a computer, and can store data in the program's directory

In electronics:

  • Portable electronics
  • Portable communications device, a wearable or handheld device
  • Portable audio player, a personal electronic device that allows the user to listen to recorded or broadcast audio whilst being mobile
  • Portable computer, a computer that is designed to be moved from one place to another
    • Compaq Portable series (1982–?)
    • Apricot Portable (1984)
    • IBM Portable Personal Computer (1984)
    • Macintosh Portable (1989–1991) from Apple Computer
  • Handheld game console, a lightweight, portable electronic machine for playing video games

In film

  • Portable Film Festival at Portable.tv

In music:

  • Portable Life, a 1999 album by Danielle Brisebois
  • Portable Sounds a 2007 album by TobyMac.

A laptop (also laptop computer), often called a notebook, is a small, portable personal computer (PC) with a "clamshell" form factor, typically having a thin LCD or LED computer screen mounted on the inside of the upper lid of the clamshell and an alphanumeric keyboard on the inside of the lower lid. The clamshell is opened up to use the computer. Laptops are folded shut for transportation, and thus are suitable for mobile use. Its name comes from lap, as it was deemed to be placed on a person's lap when being used. Although originally there was a distinction between laptops and notebooks (the former being bigger and heavier than the latter), as of 2014, there is often no longer any difference. Today, laptops are commonly used in a variety of settings, such as at work, in education, for playing games, web browsing, for personal multimedia, and general home computer use.

Laptops combine all the input/output components and capabilities of a desktop computer, including the display screen, speakers, a keyboard, data storage device, sometimes an optical disc drive, pointing devices (such as a touchpad or trackpad), with a operating system, a processor and memory into a single unit. Most modern laptops feature integrated webcams and built-in microphones, while many also have touchscreens. Laptops can be powered either from an internal battery or by an external power supply from an AC adapter. Hardware specifications, such as the processor speed and memory capacity, significantly vary between different types, makes, models and price points.

Design elements, form factor and construction can also vary significantly between models depending on intended use. Examples of specialized models of laptops include rugged notebooks for use in construction or military applications, as well as low production cost laptops such as those from the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) organization, which incorporate features like solar charging and semi-flexible components not found on most laptop computers. Portable computers, which later developed into modern laptops, were originally considered to be a small niche market, mostly for specialized field applications, such as in the military, for accountants, or for traveling sales representatives. As the portable computers evolved into the modern laptop, they became widely used for a variety of purposes.

Table may refer to:

  • Table (furniture), a piece of furniture with a flat top and one or more legs
  • Table (information), a data arrangement with rows and columns
  • Table (database)
  • Calligra Tables, a spreadsheet application
  • Mathematical table
  • Table (landform)
  • Table (parliamentary procedure)
  • Tables (board game)
  • The Table, a volcanic tuya in British Columbia, Canada
  • Table, surface of the sound board (music) of a string instrument
  • Al-Ma'ida, the fifth sura of the Qur'an, usually translated as “The Table”
  • Water table

Finish may refer to:

  • Finishing (whisky), in the distillation of Scotch
  • The aftertaste of an alcoholic beverage, particularly for:
    • whisky
    • wine
  • Finished good, a good that is completed as to manufacturing but not yet sold or distributed to the end-user
  • Surface finishing, various industrial processes for modifying a workpiece's surface
    • Mechanical finish, processes that modify a surface using mechanical means
  • Wood finishing, the process of embellishing and/or protecting the surface of wooden objects

Color (American English), or colour (Commonwealth English), is the characteristic of visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of photoreceptor cells (in particular cone cells in the human eye and other vertebrate eyes) by electromagnetic radiation (in the visible spectrum in the case of humans). Color categories and physical specifications of color are associated with objects through the wavelengths of the light that is reflected from them and their intensities. This reflection is governed by the object's physical properties such as light absorption, emission spectra, etc.

By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by coordinates, which in 1931 were also named in global agreement with internationally agreed color names like mentioned above (red, orange, etc.) by the International Commission on Illumination. The RGB color space for instance is a color space corresponding to human trichromacy and to the three cone cell types that respond to three bands of light: long wavelengths, peaking near 564–580 nm (red); medium-wavelength, peaking near 534–545 nm (green); and short-wavelength light, near 420–440 nm (blue). There may also be more than three color dimensions in other color spaces, such as in the CMYK color model, wherein one of the dimensions relates to a color's colorfulness).

The photo-receptivity of the "eyes" of other species also varies considerably from that of humans and so results in correspondingly different color perceptions that cannot readily be compared to one another. Honeybees and bumblebees for instance have trichromatic color vision sensitive to ultraviolet but is insensitive to red. Papilio butterflies possess six types of photoreceptors and may have pentachromatic vision. The most complex color vision system in the animal kingdom has been found in stomatopods (such as the mantis shrimp) with up to 12 spectral receptor types thought to work as multiple dichromatic units.

The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the study of the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what is commonly referred to simply as light).

Off or OFF may refer to:

White is the lightest color and is achromatic (having no hue). It is the color of fresh snow, chalk and milk, and is the opposite of black. White objects fully reflect and scatter all the visible wavelengths of light. White on television and computer screens is created by a mixture of red, blue and green light.

In ancient Egypt and ancient Rome, priestesses wore white as a symbol of purity, and Romans wore a white toga as a symbol of citizenship. In the Middle Ages and Renaissance a white unicorn symbolized chastity, and a white lamb sacrifice and purity. It was the royal color of the kings of France, and of the monarchist movement that opposed the Bolsheviks during the Russian Civil War (1917–1922). Greek and Roman temples were faced with white marble, and beginning in the 18th century, with the advent of neoclassical architecture, white became the most common color of new churches, capitols and other government buildings, especially in the United States. It was also widely used in 20th century modern architecture as a symbol of modernity and simplicity.

According to surveys in Europe and the United States, white is the color most often associated with perfection, the good, honesty, cleanliness, the beginning, the new, neutrality, and exactitude. White is an important color for almost all world religions. The pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church, has worn white since 1566, as a symbol of purity and sacrifice. In Islam, and in the Shinto religion of Japan, it is worn by pilgrims. In Western cultures and in Japan, white is the most common color for wedding dresses, symbolizing purity and virginity. In many Asian cultures, white is also the color of mourning.

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