Tuelip Stainless Steel Double Walled Vaccum Insulated Flask Bottle For Hot &Cold Drinks 500 ml Flask(Pack of 1, Blue, Steel)

Brand: Tuelip ID: BOTFF2MFSSZHFAES

The Tuelip Water Bottle is a vacuum insulated stainless steel flask with blue Colour design, It is useful to keep your beverages hot or cold for long hours and is very handy to carry along. Our Water ...more▼

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About this item

NAGet set for action-packed adventures with the ASUS ROG phone 2 which facilitates a blazing fast performance with great features for a seamless gaming experience. It comes with the robust ROG GameCool II cooling system to help you game for long hours, without worrying about the device being heated up. This smartphone’s 6000 mAh battery is enough to keep you hooked to your game for hours. What’s more, with features like the side-mounted ports and curved edges, this smartphone will be easy to hold and operate, no matter how you are gaming. This smartphone also comes with a dual-camera system (48 MP IMX586 main camera and a 13 MP secondary camera) and a 24 MP front camera to help you click stunning pictures or be a clear part of live streaming games.108MP quad rear camera with OIS, ultra-wide, macro, portrait, night mode, AI scene recognition, HDR, pro mode | 20MP front camera16.94 centimeters (6.67-inch) FHD+ AMOLED capacitive multi-touch touchscreen with 2340 x 1080 pixels resolution, 386 ppi pixel density and 19.5:9 aspect ratio | 3D Curved glassMemory, Storage & SIM: 8GB RAM | 128GB internal memory | Dual SIM (nano+nano) with support for 5GAndroid v10 operating system with 2.84GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 with 7nm octa core processor4780mAH lithium-polymer battery with 30W wired fast charger in-box & support for up to 30W wireless charging13MP+2MP dual rear camera | 8MP front facing camera15.79 centimeters (6.22-inch) with 1520 x 720 pixels resolutionMemory, Storage & SIM: 3GB RAM | 64GB internal memory expandable up to 512GB | Dual SIM (nano+nano) dual-standby (4G+4G)Android Pie v9.0 operating system with 1.95Ghz Snapdragon 439 processor5000mAH lithium polymer large batteryNA108MP quad rear camera with OIS, ultra-wide, macro, portrait, night mode, AI scene recognition, HDR, pro mode | 20MP front camera16.94 centimeters (6.67-inch) FHD+ AMOLED capacitive multi-touch touchscreen with 2340 x 1080 pixels resolution, 386 ppi pixel density and 19.5:9 aspect ratio | 3D Curved glassMemory, Storage & SIM: 8GB RAM | 128GB internal memory | Dual SIM (nano+nano) with support for 5GAndroid v10 operating system with 2.84GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 with 7nm octa core processor4780mAH lithium-polymer battery with 30W wired fast charger in-box & support for up to 30W wireless charging108MP quad rear camera with OIS, ultra-wide, macro, portrait, night mode, AI scene recognition, HDR, pro mode | 20MP front camera16.94 centimeters (6.67-inch) FHD+ AMOLED capacitive multi-touch touchscreen with 2340 x 1080 pixels resolution, 386 ppi pixel density and 19.5:9 aspect ratio | 3D Curved glassMemory, Storage & SIM: 8GB RAM | 128GB internal memory | Dual SIM (nano+nano) with support for 5GAndroid v10 operating system with 2.84GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 with 7nm octa core processor4780mAH lithium-polymer battery with 30W wired fast charger in-box & support for up to 30W wireless charging108MP quad rear camera with OIS, ultra-wide, macro, portrait, night mode, AI scene recognition, HDR, pro mode | 20MP front camera16.94 centimeters (6.67-inch) FHD+ AMOLED capacitive multi-touch touchscreen with 2340 x 1080 pixels resolution, 386 ppi pixel density and 19.5:9 aspect ratio | 3D Curved glassMemory, Storage & SIM: 8GB RAM | 128GB internal memory | Dual SIM (nano+nano) with support for 5GAndroid v10 operating system with 2.84GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 with 7nm octa core processor4780mAH lithium-polymer battery with 30W wired fast charger in-box & support for up to 30W wireless charging

Stainless may refer to:

  • Stainless steel, a corrosion-resistant metal alloy
  • Stainless Games, a British video game developer
  • Stainless Broadcasting Company, a TV broadcaster based in Michigan, US
  • Stainless Banner, the second national flag of the Confederate States of America

Steel is an alloy of iron with typically a few percent of carbon to improve its strength and fracture resistance compared to iron. Many other additional elements may be present or added. Stainless steels are corrosion and oxidation resistant need typically an additional 11% chromium. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, steel is best used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, trains, cars, machines, electrical appliances, and weapons. Iron is the base metal of steel and it can take on two crystalline forms (allotropic forms): body centred cubic and face-centred cubic. These forms depend on temperature. In the body-centred cubic arrangement, there is an iron atom in the centre and eight atoms at the vertices of each cubic unit cell; in the face-centred cubic, there is one atom at the centre of each of the six faces of the cubic unit cell and eight atoms at its vertices. It is the interaction of the allotropes of iron with the alloying elements, primarily carbon, that gives steel and cast iron their range of unique properties.

In pure iron, the crystal structure has relatively little resistance to the iron atoms slipping past one another, and so pure iron is quite ductile, or soft and easily formed. In steel, small amounts of carbon, other elements, and inclusions within the iron act as hardening agents that prevent the movement of dislocations.

The carbon in typical steel alloys may contribute up to 2.14% of its weight. Varying the amount of carbon and many other alloying elements, as well as controlling their chemical and physical makeup in the final steel (either as solute elements, or as precipitated phases), slows the movement of those dislocations that make pure iron ductile, and thus controls and enhances its qualities. These qualities include the hardness, quenching behaviour, need for annealing, tempering behaviour, yield strength, and tensile strength of the resulting steel. The increase in steel's strength compared to pure iron is possible only by reducing iron's ductility.

Steel was produced in bloomery furnaces for thousands of years, but its large-scale, industrial use began only after more efficient production methods were devised in the 17th century, with the introduction of the blast furnace and production of crucible steel. This was followed by the open-hearth furnace and then the Bessemer process in England in the mid-19th century. With the invention of the Bessemer process, a new era of mass-produced steel began. Mild steel replaced wrought iron.

Further refinements in the process, such as basic oxygen steelmaking (BOS), largely replaced earlier methods by further lowering the cost of production and increasing the quality of the final product. Today, steel is one of the most common manmade materials in the world, with more than 1.6 billion tons produced annually. Modern steel is generally identified by various grades defined by assorted standards organisations.

Double may refer to:

  • Look-alike, a person who closely resembles another person
  • Body double, someone who substitutes for the credited actor of a character
  • Doppelgänger, ghostly double of a living person
  • Polish Enigma doubles, replicating the function of Nazi Germany's cipher machines
  • Double, a bet which combines two selections; see Glossary of bets offered by UK bookmakers#Double
  • Double, a former fraction of the Guernsey pound
  • Double, a former rank of liturgical feast in the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church
  • Double-flowered form of plants

Flask may refer to:

A bottle is a narrow-necked container made of an impermeable material (clay, glass, plastic, aluminium etc.) in various shapes and sizes to store and transport liquids (water, milk, beer, wine, ink, cooking oil, medicine, soft drinks, shampoo, and chemicals, etc.) and whose mouth at the bottling line can be sealed with an internal stopper, an external bottle cap, a closure, or a conductive "inner seal" using induction sealing. Some of the earliest bottle appeared in China, Phoenicia, Crete, and Rome.

Hot or HOT may refer to:

Cold is the presence of low temperature, especially in the atmosphere. In common usage, cold is often a subjective perception. A lower bound to temperature is absolute zero, defined as 0.00 K on the Kelvin scale, an absolute thermodynamic temperature scale. This corresponds to −273.15 °C on the Celsius scale, −459.67 °F on the Fahrenheit scale, and 0.00 °R on the Rankine scale.

Since temperature relates to the thermal energy held by an object or a sample of matter, which is the kinetic energy of the random motion of the particle constituents of matter, an object will have less thermal energy when it is colder and more when it is hotter. If it were possible to cool a system to absolute zero, all motion of the particles in a sample of matter would cease and they would be at complete rest in this classical sense. The object would be described as having zero thermal energy. Microscopically in the description of quantum mechanics, however, matter still has zero-point energy even at absolute zero, because of the uncertainty principle.

500 may refer to:

  • 500 (number)
  • 500 BC
  • AD 500

Flask may refer to:

Pack or packs may refer to:

Blue is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. Most blues contain a slight mixture of other colours; azure contains some green, while ultramarine contains some violet. The clear daytime sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering explains blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called aerial perspective.

Blue has been an important colour in art and decoration since ancient times. The semi-precious stone lapis lazuli was used in ancient Egypt for jewellery and ornament and later, in the Renaissance, to make the pigment ultramarine, the most expensive of all pigments. In the eighth century Chinese artists used cobalt blue to colour fine blue and white porcelain. In the Middle Ages, European artists used it in the windows of cathedrals. Europeans wore clothing coloured with the vegetable dye woad until it was replaced by the finer indigo from America. In the 19th century, synthetic blue dyes and pigments gradually replaced mineral pigments and synthetic dyes. Dark blue became a common colour for military uniforms and later, in the late 20th century, for business suits. Because blue has commonly been associated with harmony, it was chosen as the colour of the flags of the United Nations and the European Union.

Surveys in the US and Europe show that blue is the colour most commonly associated with harmony, faithfulness, confidence, distance, infinity, the imagination, cold, and sometimes with sadness. In US and European public opinion polls it is the most popular colour, chosen by almost half of both men and women as their favourite colour. The same surveys also showed that blue was the colour most associated with the masculine, just ahead of black, and was also the colour most associated with intelligence, knowledge, calm and concentration.

Steel is an alloy of iron with typically a few percent of carbon to improve its strength and fracture resistance compared to iron. Many other additional elements may be present or added. Stainless steels are corrosion and oxidation resistant need typically an additional 11% chromium. Because of its high tensile strength and low cost, steel is best used in buildings, infrastructure, tools, ships, trains, cars, machines, electrical appliances, and weapons. Iron is the base metal of steel and it can take on two crystalline forms (allotropic forms): body centred cubic and face-centred cubic. These forms depend on temperature. In the body-centred cubic arrangement, there is an iron atom in the centre and eight atoms at the vertices of each cubic unit cell; in the face-centred cubic, there is one atom at the centre of each of the six faces of the cubic unit cell and eight atoms at its vertices. It is the interaction of the allotropes of iron with the alloying elements, primarily carbon, that gives steel and cast iron their range of unique properties.

In pure iron, the crystal structure has relatively little resistance to the iron atoms slipping past one another, and so pure iron is quite ductile, or soft and easily formed. In steel, small amounts of carbon, other elements, and inclusions within the iron act as hardening agents that prevent the movement of dislocations.

The carbon in typical steel alloys may contribute up to 2.14% of its weight. Varying the amount of carbon and many other alloying elements, as well as controlling their chemical and physical makeup in the final steel (either as solute elements, or as precipitated phases), slows the movement of those dislocations that make pure iron ductile, and thus controls and enhances its qualities. These qualities include the hardness, quenching behaviour, need for annealing, tempering behaviour, yield strength, and tensile strength of the resulting steel. The increase in steel's strength compared to pure iron is possible only by reducing iron's ductility.

Steel was produced in bloomery furnaces for thousands of years, but its large-scale, industrial use began only after more efficient production methods were devised in the 17th century, with the introduction of the blast furnace and production of crucible steel. This was followed by the open-hearth furnace and then the Bessemer process in England in the mid-19th century. With the invention of the Bessemer process, a new era of mass-produced steel began. Mild steel replaced wrought iron.

Further refinements in the process, such as basic oxygen steelmaking (BOS), largely replaced earlier methods by further lowering the cost of production and increasing the quality of the final product. Today, steel is one of the most common manmade materials in the world, with more than 1.6 billion tons produced annually. Modern steel is generally identified by various grades defined by assorted standards organisations.

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